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Q4 Pedia

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DISC

DISC gives you insight into the differences between people, but especially insight into yourself. What is your natural communication style? What are your unconscious motives? The starting point is the DISC model with four fundamental temperaments. It describes your natural behavioral style and provides tools for working, living and interacting with others more pleasantly.

Basic need

Your core pattern includes a number of basic needs. What do you need and what gives you energy? If you don’t meet these needs sufficiently, it costs energy and results in stress.

Conscious behaviour

Behaviour you consciously choose to exhibit. In favourable circumstances, we feel at ease and can effortlessly interpret our environment. We are aware of the behaviour that is expected of us. What we exhibit is desired behaviour.

Complementary styles

Complementary or opposite behaviour. The C temperament is complementary (indirect and task-oriented) to the I temperament (direct and people-oriented). The D temperament (direct and task-oriented) is complementary to the S temperament (indirect and people-oriented).

Conscientious temperament

Indirect and task-oriented temperament. This says something about how you deal with rules and limitations. Words associated with the C temperament are analysing, precise, patient, fact-oriented, details, studious, thinker, observer, closed, and likes privacy.

Conscious behaviour

Behaviour you consciously choose to exhibit. In favourable circumstances, we feel at ease and can effortlessly interpret our environment. We are aware of the behaviour that is expected of us. What we exhibit is desired behaviour

Direct behaviour

Extroverted behaviour. Energy is directed outwards, actively aims to meet people, expressive body language, takes risks, likes change and needs little information to form a general idea.

DISC model

The Q4 Profiles Personal Style Model is based on the DISC model. The behaviour of people can be measured based on two dimensions: indirect versus direct and task-oriented versus people-oriented. When we put these dimensions in a Graph, we get the four fundamental temperaments: Dominant, Interactive, Steady and Conscientious.

Dominant temperament

Direct and task-oriented temperament. Determines how you deal with problems and challenges. Words associated with the D temperament are direct, convincing, adventurous, driven, result and achievement oriented, quick, and takes charge.

Personal perception

The way you view something, influenced by your own convictions, experiences and perception.

Extroverted

Direct behaviour. Energy is focused outward, actively seeks out people, expressive body language, takes risks, likes change and needs little information to form a general image.

Desired behaviour

Behaviour that you consciously choose to exhibit. In favourable circumstances, we feel at ease and we are able to interpret our environment. We are aware of the behaviour that is expected of us.

Desired pattern

Desired behaviour that you consciously choose to exhibit. Read more in the Q4 Profiles Personal Style Profile, Graph I, the line Graph.

Favourable circumstances

Safe circumstances where you feel at ease. You interpret the situation and you are able to consciously choose the behaviour you want to exhibit.

Indirect behaviour

Introverted behaviour. Energy is focused inwards, likes to be alone, calm and controlled body language, careful, doesn’t like to be in the limelight, needs to collect information to create a specific idea.

Interactive temperament

Direct and people-oriented temperament. Determines how you deal with other people and how you influence others. Words associated with the I temperament are inspiring, warm, fun, excited, contact-oriented, social, charming, talkative, impulsive, and verbally strong.

Introverted

Indirect behaviour. Energy is focused inwards, likes to be alone, calm and controlled body language, careful, doesn’t like to be in the limelight, needs to collect information to create a specific idea.

Quality

A strong feature, or strength, coming from within. You don’t have to think about it; it just comes naturally to you.

Core pattern

Natural behaviour. You mainly display this behaviour when you experience stress. In stressful situations, your actions are driven by your subconscious. Read more in the Q4 Profiles Personal Style Profile Graph II, the bar Graph.

Limbic brain

Mammal brain, the social brain. The unconscious part of the brains. When a stimulus arrives, you determine how you react (unconsciously), based on habit. Habits are acquired, instinctive, and are learnt through repetition.

People-oriented

People-oriented people are emotional, informal and involved. They take decisions based on feelings and emotions, let the situation calm down in case of disputes, and perceive their environment as friendly.

Natural behaviour

Subconscious behaviour. You mainly exhibit this behaviour, your core pattern, when you experience stress. In stressful situations, our actions are driven by our subconscious. We don’t choose to do so, and we are not aware of it happening.

Neocortex

Higher, conscious brain. Is seen as the controller of our higher capacities, such as logic, thinking, and our sense of the spiritual. Conscious decisions are made in the neocortex.

Non-verbal behaviour

Gestures, body language, posture, facial expressions.

Unfavourable circumstances

Unsafe situations or circumstances in which you feel stressed or experience pressure.

Personal growth opportunities

In which ways can you grow when communicating with other people and performing your tasks?

Personal interests

Personal Interests are about what attracts you personally. What gives you energy? For example, someone who actually does not like routine work can keep it up for longer because of a specific interest.

Personal Values

Personal Values are about your perspective, your frame of reference. These are the filters that everyone builds up from the age of six. What feels right and what feels wrong. Why do you do things the way you do?

Q4 Profiles Personal Style Profile

This profile describes your Personal Style. A personal behaviour analysis to understand ourselves and others better, so that we can work more effectively with people and situations.

Frame of reference

Convictions, formed by experiences, education, environment, upbringing and background.

Reptile brain

Ancient brain or brain stem. The most primitive part of our brain, the unconscious part of the brain. Responsible for the fight-or-flight response and the many fundamental biological functions such as reproduction, breathing and our heartbeat. We can’t control this.

Noise

Deformation of a message. When there is noise in communication, the message is understood differently by the receiver to how the sender intended it, resulting in miscommunication.

Steady temperament

Indirect and people-oriented temperament. Determines your speed and how you deal with changes. Words associated with the S temperament are involved, friendly, honest, listener, attentive, team player, closed, routine, and loves harmony.

Strengths

A strong feature or quality, coming from within. You don’t have to think about it and it comes naturally to you.

Task-oriented

Task-oriented people are rational, formal and analytical. They make decisions based on facts and arguments, fight in case of disputes or strife, and see their environment as stressful and hostile.

Temperament

Behavioural style or feature. The DISC model comprises the four basic temperaments of Dominant, Interactive, Steady and Conscientious.

Pitfall

Exaggerated quality. Overusing a good feature turns it into something negative.

Verbal behaviour

The words you speak.

Preferred temperament

The behaviour or temperament that we exhibit the most, our primary temperament.

Work environment

The environment and circumstances which you are currently working in and the related tasks you need to perform. Your personal Style can be related to your work environment and work situations.

Self-image

How do you see yourself? How do you see your own behaviour? If your personal style agrees with your self-image, you are then aware of your behaviour and your unconscious basic needs. If the difference is big, you are not as conscious of your own basic needs, which can lead to energy loss and stress.

Self-insight

You have self-insight if you know how you prefer to work and under which circumstances you feel most comfortable. This is important knowledge that you can use, for example, to assess whether you fit into a certain work environment or organizational culture.

Selfknowledge

Self-knowledge is about the degree to which we are aware of our behavioral preferences and the extent to which we know our own limits. Self-knowledge makes it easier to learn from your own mistakes, but also, for example, to work together with others.